news & trends

Take the fight out of food! How to spot credible nutrition info!

Nutrition month 2017 Sue & Lucia Pledge

Eating should be joyful and pleasurable, but it can also be frustrating and confusing. Take the online pledge to take the fight out of food. Find accurate information to help you make better decisions about food and take the fight out of your food struggles.

Did you know that almost half of Canadians (49%) get their food and nutrition information from the Internet, social media or blogs? Unfortunately, not all online information can be trusted. Here’s how to spot the most credible nutrition info.

1. Talk to a dietitian – the most credible food and nutrition experts. According to the Canadian Foundation for Dietetic Research, Tracking Nutrition Trends 2015 report, only 20% of Canadians get their information from a dietitian. Yet, most Canadians (88%) say dietitians are credible sources of information. Contact us with your food and nutrition questions.

2. Ask questions. Evaluate online nutrition advice by asking:
• Who runs the website?
• Is the website trying to sell something?
• Does it sound too good to be true?
• Where does the information come from?
• Is the information based on more than one clinical study?
• Was the study done in animals or humans?
• Was the information / study reviewed by an editorial board?

3. Go to these trusted websites.
Some of our favourite information sources are:
Weiler Nutrition Communications Inc.
Nutrition Solutions Inc.
Dietitians of Canada
Eat Right Ontario
Healthy Canadians

4. Look for the Dietitians of Canada Member Blog badge
. We’ve met the blog criteria from our professional organization, and are proud to share our expert, credible, evidence-based insights!

DC member blog badge


This post has been adapted from Dietitians of Canada’s Nutrition Month campaign materials. Find more information about Nutrition Month at www.NutritionMonth2017.ca

What’s on the MENU?

what's on the menu blog march 2017

Have you noticed the new calorie labelling on Ontario chain restaurant menus? Operators, servers and consumers are coming to grips with the new reality of revealing calories in a serving of food. We’ve been busy moderating partnership events and engaging with stakeholders about the challenges of the new menu labelling. The events were in collaboration with Canadian Association of Foodservice Professionals (CAFP), Restaurants Canada and Dietitians of Canada.

A shout out to fellow dietitian Donna Bottrell who did a terrific job organizing the events, and to Nancy Hewitt President CAFP Toronto for her support.  

CAFP lucia moderator event
From left: Donna Bottrell, organizer of the event; Nancy Hewitt, CFE, President of the CAFP Toronto Branch; Susan Somerville, Dean, from Humber College, and Panelist Jamie Rillet and Moderator Lucia Weiler.

Here is a snapshot of what we heard:

  • ‘Medium and small chains are looking for guidance and consistency from the Government.’ Jamie Rilett, Restaurants Canada
  • ‘It’s challenging for a server to explain the calorie range for a serving size. More support and education would be helpful’ K.B.Bose, Shoeless Joe’s
  • ‘There is the nutrient variable to consider and educate about. How to address the fact that milk has more calories than pop but it’s also more nutritious?’ Katie Jessop RD
  • ‘Collaboration is needed between food professionals: chefs, dietitians and nutritionists.  And we are eating foods- not just one food. Food combinations in menus can help create healthier options. Nutrition professionals can assist operators and consumers.’   Lucia Weiler RD
  • ‘A lot of time was spent by Aramark in the initial analysis…they made sure to standardize recipes and then tested and tested which led to a recipe database.’ Karen Williams, Aramark
  • ‘Menu calorie labelling is just the beginning. There is a future importance for all aspects of nutrition and food, especially sustainable processing. Millennial consumers are very conscious about the’ what’ and the ‘how’ of food.’ K.B.Bose, Shoeless Joe’s

For more stakeholder views and participant feedback please contact us. We would be happy to help your team formulate unique insights that integrate our Registered Dietitian expertise in food and nutrition and provide you with solutions that both foodservice professionals and consumers can use.